Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger Review

It’s not uncommon for individuals to own a phone and tablet concurrently. That’s not complicated when you don’t have many chargers to handle with. But when you include family members, that’s a different story. Personally I own more than 2 devices and I have trouble trying to find power sockets to house different chargers. I chanced upon the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger and it seems like a worthy solution my problem. Does it perform just as well as dedicated chargers? Let’s find out.

Does this look familiar to you?

Clutter!

Clutter!

 

 

 

Want it to be like this?

Declutter!

Declutter!

 

Introducing the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger.

Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger

Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger

 

The footprint of the charger is the size of a pack of cards. It’s lightweight, small and doesn’t add much bulk to my table.

Size of a pack of cards

Size of a pack of cards

 

You will usually get the output current you see on your chargers when you use the device that is compatible with it. Meaning if my LG Optimus G Pro charger has a 1.2A output, I will get up to 1.2A output only when I charge the LG Optimus G Pro phone with it. If I were to charge another phone with the LG Charger, it will probably not have the same output because phones are also regulated. Likewise if I use another charger to charge the LG Optimus G Pro, the charger will probably not output the same current as with the original LG charger.
Internally, chargers are configured differently and phones are regulated to different currents so results may vary.

PowerIQ

PowerIQ

 

The Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger features their PowerIQ technology which counters this problem. It solves the compatibility issue between charger and phones by detecting the device that is plugged in, and outputs the fastest charge.

I was apprehensive that the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger will not output the same current as the original chargers, so I used the Doctor Charger to test the output.

The following 5 devices was used for this test. The table shows the output current labeled on the original charger, the output current from the original charger and the output current from the Anker Charger. All values are approximates.

Model Current on Charger Output from charger Output from Anker charger
iPad Mini 2 1A 0.93A 1.72A
Galaxy Tab 7.7 2A 1.45A 1.08A
HTC Sensation 1A 0.80A 0.78A
LG Optimus G Pro 1.2A 1.03A 1.04A
Nexus 7 1.35A 1.10A 1.11A

The Galaxy Tab 7.7 does not charge from the Anker because there is not enough current. This tab requires at least 1.30A+ to be able to charge. You might want to check your devices if it really needs alot of current to be able to charge. Also to note is that the iPad Mini supplied charger output is 1A, but the iPad Mini is able to draw near 1.70A.

Replacing the Galaxy Tab 7.7 with iPad mini 1, the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger can still supply the power for all 5 devices. As the total output for the 5 ports is stated as 8A, as long the combined current of the 5 devices do not exceed 8A, there shouldn’t be a problem charging all devices together.

The contents

The contents

 

Apart from not able to charge my Tab 7.7, the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger has far exceeded my expectations. The ability to reduce clutter on my desk, the ease of portability due to its small footprint and also charge 5 devices at once, it’s a no brainer. This Anker charger is a God-send for travelers to reduce bulk in their luggage. If you like your desk to be less cluttered, able to charge many devices but only using 1 power plug, I highly recommend the Anker 5-Port Desktop Charger.

Richard

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